Share this page on LinkedIn
Share This Page on Google+
Share This Page on Twitter
tell someone about this page print this page
You are here: Contents > 2014 > Volume 23 Number 4 July 2014 > AORTIC VALVE DISEASE > Relation of Cuspal Asymmetry to Development of Aortic Stenosis in Adults with Tricuspid Aortic Valves

Relation of Cuspal Asymmetry to Development of Aortic Stenosis in Adults with Tricuspid Aortic Valves

Lee Joseph1, Amar Krishnaswamy1, E. Murat Tuzcu1, Abraham Sonny2, Alper Ozkan1, Lars G. Svensson3, Brian P. Griffin1, James Thomas1, Samir R. Kapadia1

Departments of 1Cardiovascular Medicine, 2Anesthesiology, and 3Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Background and aim of the study: Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is known to be associated with aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta (AA) dilatation. However, the relationship between BAV morphology and AA dimensions remains unclear. Thus, the study aim was to characterize the aortic valve function and AA dimensions according to the presence of raphe and BAV phenotype.

Methods: A total of 164 patients with BAV who underwent aortic valve surgery between October 2007 and November 2012 was investigated. BAV was classified as either type I (anterior-posterior orientation) or type II (right-left orientation), and subdivided as raphe+ (presence of raphe) and raphe- (no raphe).

Results: Type I BAV was present in 103 patients (62.8%),

and raphe+ in 100 (61.0%). Patients with raphe+ were typically younger than those with raphe-, and male gender was more predominant (88.0% and 53.1%, respectively, p <0.05). Aortic regurgitation was more common in patients with type I and raphe+ BAV, and aortic stenosis in patients with type II and raphe- BAV. In patients with raphe+, the diameters of aortic annulus related to the body surface area (BSA) were larger, and the diameters of the tubular portion of AA indexed to BSA were smaller than in patients with raphe- (p <0.05).

Conclusion: BAV morphology is helpful for predicting the type of aortic valve dysfunction and the location of AA dilatation.

The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2014;23:406-413


Relation of Cuspal Asymmetry to Development of Aortic Stenosis in Adults with Tricuspid Aortic Valves

Click the above hyperlink to view the article, right click (Ctrl click on a Mac) to open in a new browser window or tab.

Purchase this Article

Please click the button below to purchase this article. Single article purchases are provided at $50.00 per article. Upon clicking the button below, single article user account subscription details are requested and, upon successful payment, a single article user account is created. Single articles are availble in your account for seven days after purchase.