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You are here: Contents > 2004 > Volume 13 Number 6 November 2004 > TRICUSPID VALVE DISEASE > Tricuspid Valve Replacement: Clinical Long-Term Results for Acquired Isolated Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation

Tricuspid Valve Replacement: Clinical Long-Term Results for Acquired Isolated Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation

Ariane Maleszka, Georg Kleikamp, Reiner Koerfer
Department of Thoracic- and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Center Northrhine-Westfalia, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany

Background and aim of the study: Acquired isolated tricuspid valve insufficiency (TVI) is a rare condition, and tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) is reserved for those patients in whom operative repair is not possible. The long-term follow up of patients who underwent isolated TVR at the authors’ institution was analyzed.
Methods: All patients (n = 107) who underwent TVR between January 1985 and December 2002 were identified from a clinical database. Among 87 multiple valve replacements, 20 consecutive patients (12 females, eight males; mean age 52.4 years) were encountered who underwent TVR for acquired isolated TVI. Preoperative and perioperative data were recorded retrospectively. The patients and/or their physicians were contacted directly to determine long-term outcome; the follow up was 100% complete.
Results: The mean follow up period was 40.8 months (range: 1-211 months). The cause of TVI was endocarditis (n = 6) or trauma (n = 1); two patients suffered from hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, and one patient had endomyocardial

fibrosis. TVI was related to constrictive pericarditis (n = 1) and to prior heart transplantation (n = 3). Seven patients were in NYHA functional classes I/II, and 13 were in classes III/IV. TVR was performed with either a mechanical valve (n = 15) or a bioprosthesis (n = 5). One patient (5%) died perioperatively, and five (25%) died during the follow up period. Two patients underwent a redo-operation during follow up, one due to prosthetic endocarditis, and one after thrombosis of a mechanical prosthesis. There was no structural deterioration of biological prostheses, and no bleeding due to anticoagulation with mechanical prostheses. Among the surviving patients, 13 were in NYHA class I, and one was in class II/III at the time of follow up.
Conclusion: Isolated TVR for acquired TVI is rarely performed. Among the present patients, perioperative mortality and morbidity were lower than previously reported in the literature. The long-term outcome appeared to be largely dependent on the etiology of the regurgitation.
The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2004;13:957-961

Tricuspid Valve Replacement: Clinical Long-Term Results for Acquired Isolated Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation

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