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You are here: Contents > 2006 > Volume 15 Number 3 May 2006 > AORTIC VALVE DISEASE > Body Mass Index: A Risk Factor for 30-day or Six-Month Mortality in Patients Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement?

Body Mass Index: A Risk Factor for 30-day or Six-Month Mortality in Patients Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement?

Ines Florath, Alexander A. Albert, Ulrich P. Rosendahl, Wael M. Hassanein, Stefan Bauer, Ina C. Ennker, Juergen C. Ennker

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Institute Lahr/Baden, Lahr, Germany

Background and aim of the study: In recent studies, the impact of a low or high body mass index (BMI) on outcome after cardiac surgery has been the subject of controversy. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the influence of BMI on 30-day and six-month mortality after aortic valve replacement (AVR).
Methods: A multivariable logistic regression was performed on data from 1,241 consecutive patients (mean age 69 ± 11 years) who underwent AVR either with (n = 514; 41%) or without coronary artery bypass grafting CABG between 2000 and 2003. A wide spectrum of periprocedural variables was collected, including laboratory data as markers for nutritional status and comorbidity. Patients were followed up for six months after AVR (99% complete).
Results: Mortality rates after 30 days and after six months were 3.9% (n = 49) and 7.6% (n = 94), respectively. A low BMI was identified as an independent risk factor for 30-day (OR (odds ratio) 0.87; CI (confidence interval) 0.8-0.94) and six-month mortality (OR 0.91; CI 0.86-0.96).


The relationship between the logit function and BMI was linear; however, a BMI value of 24 was considered an appropriate cut-off point. Both models containing the BMI linearly or dichotomic were equivalent. As patients with a lower BMI differ in their preoperative risk profile compared to those with a higher BMI, a saturated propensity score estimating the propensity towards having a BMI <24 was calculated. The propensity score was not significant in the final models for 30-day and six-month mortality (0.24 and 0.73, respectively), and the OR for BMI remained largely unaltered (0.89 and 0.91, respectively).
Conclusion: A BMI <24 is predictive of an increased risk of mortality after AVR, independently of malnutrition, advanced heart disease, or valve size. Further studies are required to investigate the role of adipose tissue in extreme situations and chronic disease. It is mandatory to include BMI in outcome studies after AVR.
The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2006;15:336-344

Body Mass Index: A Risk Factor for 30-day or Six-Month Mortality in Patients Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement?

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