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You are here: Contents > 2006 > Volume 15 Number 1 January 2006 > PULMONARY AUTOGRAFT > The Occurrence of Postoperative Pulmonary Homograft Stenosis in Adult Patients Undergoing the Ross Procedure

The Occurrence of Postoperative Pulmonary Homograft Stenosis in Adult Patients Undergoing the Ross Procedure

William H. Ryan, Morley A. Herbert, Todd M. Dewey, Shivum Agarwal, Anne L. Ryan, Syma L. Prince, Michael J. Mack

Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, Cardiopulmonary Research Science and Technology Institute, Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital, Dallas, Texas, USA

Background and aim of the study: The Ross procedure employs an autologous pulmonary valve to replace the aortic valve, but requires pulmonary homograft replacement. Concerns regarding long-term homograft function may limit the adoption of this technique. Herein, the incidence of, and factors leading to, stenosis of the homograft were examined.
Methods: Data were collected from 131 patients (32 females, 99 males) who underwent a Ross procedure between July 1994 and December 2003. Complete follow up data were collected from 113 of 125 (90.4%) living patients. Donor valve information, including storage time, was supplied by the graft manufacturers. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, t-test and logistic regression.
Results: The mean patient follow up was 703 ± 574 days (median 599 days; range: 2 to 2,408 days). Echocardiographic stenosis had occurred in 14 patients (12.4%). Four patients (3.2%) required homograft replacement, and two required balloon valvuloplasty. There was no significant difference in graft vendor, recipient, donor age or blood type match

between stenotic and non-stenotic recipients. Donor valve size was appropriate for the recipients, and greater than predicted by recipient body surface area (BSA). Donor valves that developed stenosis had a shorter storage time after processing (160 ± 100 versus 249 ± 223 days; p = 0.03). Male donor valves became stenotic in 9.9% (7/71) of male recipients, but in none of 20 females. Female donor valves became stenotic in 27.3% (3/11) of male recipients, and in 28.6% (2/7) females. Logistic regression showed donor gender to be a significant predictor for stenosis (p = 0.007; odds ratio 14.1 for female/male donors; 95% CI 2.1-96.4).
Conclusion: Donor valves which developed stenosis had a shorter mean cryopreservation time than those that did not develop stenosis. In addition, female donor homografts appeared to develop stenosis at a greater rate, independent of patient age, graft size to BSA match, and blood type.


The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2006;15:108-114

The Occurrence of Postoperative Pulmonary Homograft Stenosis in Adult Patients Undergoing the Ross Procedure

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