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You are here: Contents > 2012 > Volume 21 Number 4 July 2012 > AORTIC VALVE DISEASE > Urgent Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarians: Does an ‘Urgent’ Status Increase Morbidity and Mortality?

Urgent Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarians: Does an ‘Urgent’ Status Increase Morbidity and Mortality?

Changyong Yang, Dadong Li, Roger Mennett, Jonathan Hammond2, Gong Zhang, Donghui Chen, Robert Gallagher

Cardiovascular Surgery Department of Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China, Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Research, and Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA

Background and aim of the study: The study aim was to investigate the influence of ‘urgent’ status on short and long-term mortality and morbidity in a consecutive series of octogenarian patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR).
Methods: Between January 2005 and March 2009, data were extracted for 141 consecutive patients aged over 80 years who underwent AVR either urgently (n = 49) or electively (n = 92). Early outcomes (in-hospital mortality, postoperative morbidities) and long-term outcomes were compared during a 39-month follow up period. The outcomes were compared after adjustment for differences in baseline risk factors.
Results: Patients of the ‘urgent’ group were older and

had more comorbidities than those in the ‘elective’ group. There was a non-significant trend towards a higher in-hospital mortality in the ‘urgent’ group (10.2% versus 4.3%, p = 0.18). The 39-month survival rate was 81% in elective patients, and 71% in urgent patients (p = 0.166).
Conclusion: AVR can be performed in the elderly population with acceptable early and mid-term results, despite their urgent status. A large clinical trial is warranted to confirm the influence of an urgent status in octogenarian patients treated with surgical AVR.

The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2012;21:487-493

Urgent Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarians: Does an ‘Urgent’ Status Increase Morbidity and Mortality?

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