Share this page on LinkedIn
Share This Page on Google+
Share This Page on Twitter
tell someone about this page print this page
You are here: Contents > 2013 > Volume 22 Number 3 May 2013 > MISCELLANEOUS > Presence of Valvular Calcification Predicts the Response to Cinacalcet: Data from the ADVANCE Study

Presence of Valvular Calcification Predicts the Response to Cinacalcet: Data from the ADVANCE Study

Antonio Bellasi1, Maureen Reiner2, Frank Petavy3, William Goodman2, Juergen Floege4, Paolo Raggi5

1Division of Nephrology, Sant’ Anna Hospital, Como, Italy, 2Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA, 3Amgen Ltd., Uxbridge, UK, 4RWTH University, Aachen, Germany, 5Division of Cardiology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Background and aim of the study: Cardiac valve calcification (CVC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) appear to be linked pathogenetically, and both are associated with a poor prognosis among patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis (CKD-5D). Little is known, however, about factors that affect the progression of CVC and CAC.

Methods: A post-hoc analysis was performed of the ADVANCE study to assess whether patients with CVC are more prone to CAC progression, and whether CVC predicts the response to different treatments for secondary hyperparathyroidism.

Results: Subjects were randomized to treatment with either cinacalcet and low doses of vitamin D analogs or larger, varying doses of vitamin D. Among 235 subjects, aortic valve or mitral valve calcification was detected in

108 (46%) and 118 (50%), respectively; 69 subjects (29%) had calcification of both valves. CVC was associated both with baseline CAC and CAC progression (p <0.05). Subjects with aortic valve calcification who were treated with cinacalcet and low doses of vitamin D experienced less progression of CAC than subjects given larger, varying doses of vitamin D (adjusted OR: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.10, 0.64). This effect was greater in subjects with larger CAC burden at baseline.

Conclusion: The study findings suggest that CVC is a predictor of CAC progression and, potentially, of greater cardiovascular vulnerability. Treatment with cinacalcet combined with low doses of vitamin D slowed the progression of CAC compared to therapy using larger, varying doses of vitamin D.

The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2013;22:391-399

Presence of Valvular Calcification Predicts the Response to Cinacalcet: Data from the ADVANCE Study

Click the above hyperlink to view the article, right click (Ctrl click on a Mac) to open in a new browser window or tab.

Purchase this Article

Please click the button below to purchase this article. Single article purchases are provided at $50.00 per article. Upon clicking the button below, single article user account subscription details are requested and, upon successful payment, a single article user account is created. Single articles are availble in your account for seven days after purchase.