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You are here: Contents > 2015 > Volume 24 Number 4 July 2015 > REPLACEMENT DEVICE EVALUATION > Does the Homograft for RVOT Reconstruction in Ross Patients Fare Better than for Non-Ross Patients? A Single-Center Experience

Does the Homograft for RVOT Reconstruction in Ross Patients Fare Better than for Non-Ross Patients? A Single-Center Experience

Mark Ruzmetov, Dale M. Geiss, Jitendra J. Shah, Randall S. Fortuna, Karl F. Welke

Children’s Hospital of Illinois, OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, and University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, Illinois, USA

Background and aim of the study: In patients undergoing the Ross procedure, the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) conduit is inserted in an orthotopic position rather than in the more heterotopic position used in the repair of complex congenital RVOT obstruction. The study aim was to compare the authors’ institutional mid-term experience of large-sized homografts (>19 mm) in patients with Ross and non-Ross RVOT reconstructions.

Methods: The outcome was reviewed of all homografts implanted for Ross (n = 72) or non-Ross (n = 64) RVOT reconstruction at a single center between 1993 and 2012. Echocardiographic data were reviewed to evaluate valve performance. Homograft dysfunction was defined as RVOT obstruction with peak echo-Doppler gradient >40 mmHg and/or grade >III/IV conduit valve regurgitation. Homograft failure was defined as the need for conduit replacement or catheter or surgical reintervention.

Results: The age, body weight, conduit diameter and previous surgery were significantly higher in patients with Ross compared to the non-Ross group (p = 0.002, 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). The mean follow up duration was similar in both groups. There were 35 re-interventions (Ross, n = 17; non-Ross, n = 18). The data acquired showed actuarial survival, freedom from conduit dysfunction and conduit failure to be similar in both cohorts. Freedom from any type of reoperation was worse for the Ross group (58%) than for the non-Ross group (72%) (p = 0.05).

Conclusion: During the first 15 years after Ross or non-Ross pulmonary homograft implantation, the survival rate, freedom from failure and dysfunction, and RVOT gradient were statistically similar. Freedom from any type of reoperation was significantly higher in the non-Ross group, however.

The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2015;24:478-483

Does the Homograft for RVOT Reconstruction in Ross Patients Fare Better than for Non-Ross Patients? A Single-Center Experience

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