Share this page on LinkedIn
Share This Page on Google+
Share This Page on Twitter
tell someone about this page print this page
You are here: Contents > 2015 > Volume 24 Number 5 September 2015 > MITRAL VALVE DISEASE > Managing Ventricular Septal Defect with Associated Aortic Regurgitation: Two Decades of Experience

Managing Ventricular Septal Defect with Associated Aortic Regurgitation: Two Decades of Experience

Ahmed Sanoussi1, Helene Demanet1, Hughes Dessy2, Martial Massin2, Dominique Biarent3, Andree Deville3, Pierre Wauthy1

1Department of Cardiac Surgery, Brugmann University Hospital, Brussels, 2Clinic of Congenital Cardiology, Children’s Hospital Queen Fabiola, Brussels, 3Department of Anesthesia and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Children’s Hospital Queen Fabiola, Brussels, Belgium

Background and aim of the study: Ventricular septal defect (VSD) with aortic regurgitation (AR) is a well-known association. However, there is still no agreement about its management, particularly regarding the technical details of its operative treatment. The study aim was to describe all components of the syndrome and to evaluate the various techniques used with regards to its anatomical and functional features.

Methods: A total of 31 patients (mean age 7.4 years; range: 1.0-14.3 years) who underwent repair of VSD and AR between 1990 and 2013 was reviewed. The VSD was perimembranous in 22 patients, and subarterial in nine. Trusler’s valvuloplasty technique was used in 15 patients, Yacoub’s technique in seven, and Carpentier’s technique (triangular resection) in four. Two patients underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR), and three patients with no significant aortic valve lesions underwent

a simple patch repair of the VSD.

Results: The aortic valvuloplasty results were generally good, with an initial aortic valvuloplasty avoiding AVR. During the immediate postoperative period, valvuloplasty failure occurred in three patients, regardless of the technique used, and all three patients were reoperated on. The mean duration of follow up was 8.5 years (range: 3.2-20.6 years). The initial result was maintained in all patients, except for four who underwent late AVR.

Conclusion: The study findings contributed to an analysis of VSD and AR, and helped to clarify the best surgical strategy. The results obtained suggest that adequacy of the initial repair is the most important determinant of subsequent evolution.

The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2015;24:590-595


Managing Ventricular Septal Defect with Associated Aortic Regurgitation: Two Decades of Experience

Click the above hyperlink to view the article, right click (Ctrl click on a Mac) to open in a new browser window or tab.

Purchase this Article

Please click the button below to purchase this article. Single article purchases are provided at $50.00 per article. Upon clicking the button below, single article user account subscription details are requested and, upon successful payment, a single article user account is created. Single articles are availble in your account for seven days after purchase.