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You are here: Contents > 2016 > Volume 25 Number 2 March 2016 > AORTIC VALVE DISEASE > Ventricular Septal Defect from Aortic Regurgitation Jet Lesion in Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis

Ventricular Septal Defect from Aortic Regurgitation Jet Lesion in Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis

Sergiu Darabant, Shelby B. Oberton, Luis P. Roldan, Carlos A. Roldan

University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Aortic valve infective endocarditis (IE) can be complicated with severe aortic regurgitation (AR) jet-related lesions such as vegetations, pseudoaneurysms, aneurysms or perforations on the anterior mitral leaflet. Herein is reported the case of a 69-year-old male with culture-negative aortic valve endocarditis complicated with aortic valve perforations resulting in severe and eccentric AR and an AR jet-related ventricular septal defect (VSD). Neither transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) nor two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE) were unable to clearly discriminate an aorto-right ventricular fistula from a VSD. By contrast, three-dimensional TEE (3D-TEE) demonstrated multiple aortic valve vegetations, aortic valve perforations, severe AR, and an AR jet-related VSD. The 3D-TEE findings were confirmed at surgery, the aortic valve was replaced with a bioprosthetic valve, and the VSD was repaired with a pericardial patch. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a VSD resulting from an AR jet lesion to be detected and characterized using 3D-TEE. The accurate preoperative diagnosis and characterization of the VSD with 3D-TEE contributed to successful surgery and the patient’s short- and long-term survival.


Video 1A: This four-chamber transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) view with color Doppler shows a color-Doppler jet traversing the basal interventricular septum (IVS) into the right ventricle, predominantly during systole. However, the origin of the jet resulting from an aortic-right ventricular fistula cannot be determined. A mild to moderate degree of tricuspid regurgitation is also noted.

Video 1B: Close-up view of the basal IVS demonstrates a color Doppler jet traversing the IVS, predominantly during systole and apparently originating in the left ventricular outflow tract side, as illustrated by a color Doppler acceleration zone. However, and as in Fig. 1A, the origin of the jet resulting from an aortic-right ventricular fistula cannot be determined.

Video 1C: Color Doppler two-dimensional TEE view longitudinal to the aortic valve and aortic root, showing a predominantly systolic color Doppler jet originating in the left ventricular outflow tract and/or aorta and crossing the anterior and basal IVS defect into the right ventricle.

Videos 1D: These three-dimensional TEE en-face left ventricular outflow tract views of the aortic valve and basal anterior IVS (Video 1D) and medial anterior close up (Video 1E) and lateral en-face (Video 1F) views of the LV outflow tract and IVS clearly define the anterior and basal location of the VSD with irregular borders and a residual mobile tissue fragment. Multiple aortic valve vegetations and a perforation are visible in Video 1D.

Videos 1E: These three-dimensional TEE en-face left ventricular outflow tract views of the aortic valve and basal anterior IVS (Video 1D) and medial anterior close up (Video 1E) and lateral en-face (Video 1F) views of the LV outflow tract and IVS clearly define the anterior and basal location of the VSD with irregular borders and a residual mobile tissue fragment. Multiple aortic valve vegetations and a perforation are visible in Video 1D.

Videos 1F: These three-dimensional TEE en-face left ventricular outflow tract views of the aortic valve and basal anterior IVS (Video 1D) and medial anterior close up (Video 1E) and lateral en-face (Video 1F) views of the LV outflow tract and IVS clearly define the anterior and basal location of the VSD with irregular borders and a residual mobile tissue fragment. Multiple aortic valve vegetations and a perforation are visible in Video 1D.

The Journal of Heart Valve Disease 2016;25:150-152

Ventricular Septal Defect from Aortic Regurgitation Jet Lesion in Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis

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